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Spring 2021 French Classes in Montclair

Interested in Translation or Teaching? Consider taking French classes at Montclair State University, only 13 miles from New York and easily accessible by mass transit.

The French program at Montclair offers:

  • BA in French with concentrations in French civilization, translation, and teaching
  • A 5-year joint BA/MA in French Studies
  • An MA in French with a concentration in Professional Translation or French Studies
  • Various pathways to becoming an NJ certified teacher.

Spring 2021 courses include Films of the French-Speaking World, Contemporary French Civilization, Computer Assisted Translation, Legal Translation, Seventeenth-Century French Theater and much more!

Sign up for our upcoming online Graduate School Open House on Oct. 24 or feel free to contact Professor Elizabeth Emery: emerye@montclair.edu. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @msufrench

Venez nombreux! Au plaisir de vous voir à Montclair!

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7998971854?profile=RESIZE_710xOn October 2, I was thrilled to join Council Member Ben Kallos, French Consul Jérémie Robert, Community Education Council President Maud Maron, parents, teachers, and school administrators for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate two new French dual language classes that have opened at the District 2 Pre-K Center located at 355 East 76th Street in Manhattan. The joyous occasion for the families who attended the ribbon cutting and for all supporters comes after a very dedicated group of parents, including members of the Francophone community from Canada, Africa, and France, met with more than two hundred families who pledged to send their children to a French dual language program in Manhattan if one was created. I particularly congratulate the incredible efforts put forth by parents such as Stéphane Lautner, Catherine Rémy, and Nadia Levy who have kept the torch of the Bilingual Revolution burning in Manhattan even during these tough times. The French dual language classes began on September 21st with seats for 36 pre-K students. The Department of Education will operate these classes using a side-by-side instructional model where it will have one Early Childhood-certified teacher who is fluent in French and who has or will work towards a bilingual extension, alongside a second Early Childhood-certified teacher.

Here are quotes from some of the participants as well as a news report and additional photos and links.

“I am incredibly proud of the people who did the work in order to make this program a reality. Knowledge is power so any opportunity we get to expand and improve education in my district I will be supportive of. We all know the benefits of dual language education and I am proud that we were able to bring them to this district,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “Thank you to Deputy Chancellor Josh Wallack for his ongoing partnership in expanding early education opportunities, the French Consulate for supporting the Francophone community, and especially to Stephane Lautner and Catherine Remy who worked closely with my office to put meetings together and organize hundreds of other parents.”

7998960687?profile=RESIZE_710x“We’re thrilled to provide our youngest learners with another new Pre-K Dual Language program, which will prepare them to succeed in our diverse, multilingual world. With over 100 Dual Language Pre-K programs in 10 languages across the five boroughs, we continue to celebrate the multiculturism that makes up New York City and enriches all students’ learning,” said Josh Wallack Deputy Chancellor, Division of Early Childhood Education and Student Enrollment.

“This new French Dual Language is an amazing opportunity for New Yorkers to immerse into a new language, regardless of their personal background. It’s also a key to integration for francophone families. This program embraces all the cultural diversity of New York City,” said Jérémie Robert.Consul General of France in New York.

“Being bilingual is an undeniable advantage in today’s increasingly globalized world. The study of two languages has been found to increase creativity and cultural awareness, making it an invaluable asset for our multicultural society. That it can be offered to more young children in our public schools is a gift that will keep on giving.” said Fabrice Jaumont, PhD. Education Attaché of the Embassy of France and Author of The Bilingual Revolution.

7998961298?profile=RESIZE_710x“The opening of this bilingual program represents the culmination of two years of efforts to demonstrate the demand in the community. Our waitlist of over 100 students, coming from throughout Manhattan, speaks volumes about the need for such programs. We believe in public education as a common good to serve our communities. Bilingual public education programs help children and communities maintain links to culture, heritage, and identity,” said Stephane Lautner, parent organizer and local resident. “This program is a first step towards creating a new K-5/8 pathway for children interested in learning or maintaining a second language. We look forward to continuing this work in collaboration with our partners in the Department of Education, City Council, and Community Education Council.” 

“Constructing an identity through two languages and two cultures is a challenge that parents and bilingual kids can now take up more easily here in New York City District 2. As a believer in Public Schools, I am proud of this program and the diverse community that it has brought together,” said Catherine Remy parent organizer and local resident.

“When I brought my daughter to her first in-person day at our new East 76th street French dual language pre-k, I felt pure joy.  That feeling came from knowing that anyone in the community will be able to have access to this program and that parents can finally offer their children a public French dual language education.  I hope this is a stepping stone for the creation of other public dual language programs, as I firmly believe that bilingualism/multilingualism is a benefit to our children,” said Nadia Levy parent organizer and local resident.

“The parents who came together to advocate for this program were passionate and dedicated—and their hard work paid off for all the children who are now enrolled and for future children who will benefit from this program. I look forward to working with CM Kallos, the superintendent and the parents to find an elementary school to continue the French DL program in D2,” said Community Education Council 2 President Maud Maron.

 Families interested in learning more about pre-K admissions and receiving notification when the pre-K application opens for the 2021-22 school year can visit nyc.gov/prek.

Related

Opening of the First French Dual Language Program in the Upper East Side: Meet Aneesha Jacko, Director of Early Childhood Education for the District 2 Pre-K Centers. By Catherine Remy

French Dual Language Pre-Kindergarten to Launch on the Upper East Side Response to Demand from Parents and Council Member Ben Kallos

French Dual Language Program Celebrates Start on the Upper East Side with 36 Pre-K Seats

 

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It's a pleausre to invite you all to join in the ninth annual edition of Seuls en Scène, Princeton French Theater Festival, entirely virtual this year! Seuls en Scène introduces American audiences to contemporary French theater and takes place annually, in September, on the Princeton University campus. It is curated by Florent Masse, Director of L'Avant-Scène and Senior Lecturer in the Department of French and Italian. This year a dozen online events will highlight the fesival running from Thursday September 10, until Sunday, September 20. This ninth edition of the festival has been prepared in collaboration with the 49th edition of Festival d’Automne à Paris.

Starting this Thursday September 10, a Conversation on the state of French main festivals and theaters will launch the festival followed by a captivating documentary film on the creative process behind the show DU SALE! by Marion Siéfert that premiered at Théâtre de la Commune in Aubervilliers. On Friday, playwright Penda Diouf will read her most recent text Pistes. To prepare this reading, she has worked with celebrated Burkinabe director Aristide Tarnagda. On Saturday, we'll offer another reading specially made for us: Sandy Ouvrier and Astrid Bayiha will read a few scenes by Jean Racine during Fragments Racine. On Sunday, two live Zoom conversations will take place in the afternoon and feature Penda Diouf and Aristide Tarnagda followed by Marion Siéfert and Mathieu Bareyre.

We'll stream La Dispute by Mohamed El Khatib from Sunday evening, September 13, and the exciting Rituels series by Emilie Rousset and Louise Hémon from Tuesday, September 15. The Rituels series includes Le Grand Débat, not to be missed in this election season! The festival will end with the show for all audiences Rémi by Hector Malot, directed by Jonathan Capdevielle.

During week 2 of the festival there will also be live Zoom conversations: with Mohamed El Khatib on Wednesday, September 16, and Jonathan Capdevielle on September, 20. The conversation with artists Émilie Rousset and Louise Hémon will be prerecorded and available for streaming on Friday, September 18.

All online events are free and open to the public. They're accessible on the festival web pages from the days when they start streaming. On average, most online offerings are available for three days, except for the opening Conversation on the state of festivals and theaters in France, and Fragments Racine).

Registration on Eventbrite is required for the live Zoom converstions (link below).

- Here is the festival web pages on the site of the Lewis Center for the Arts: https://arts.princeton.edu/frenchtheater/ and those maintained by the Departement of French and Italian: https://fit.princeton.edu/

- The Eventbrite link for registration to the conversations: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/seuls-en-scene-princeton-french-theater-festival-11090010440

- And our festival promo video!: https://vimeo.com/454847678/582b426956

We look forward to seeing you soon!

All the best

Florent Masse

Princeton University
Department of French and Italian

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Bonjour tout le monde! I hope that you're all doing well. I'm new to "New York in French". My name is Bernadette and I'm a film student at a university in Queens; I also study French. I love all things French - the language itself, music, film, food, art, you name it!

For my senior project film at university, I'm making a documentary about French culture in NYC. I'm currently searching for interviewees. I'd love to speak to French people living in NYC, French writers, film directors, musicians, or artists living in NYC, owners or chefs at French restaurants/ bakeries, French teachers - basically anyone French/ doing French-related things in NYC! If any of this applies to you and you'd be interested in appearing in my documentary, let me know! 

The interview would be conducted over Zoom/ Skype/ Facetime (whatever you feel most comfortable with), and would only take about 30-40 minutes (10 minutes to chat/ get set up, and 20-30 minutes for the actual interview. I would send you the questions I'd like to ask you ahead of time. This documentary is for educational purposes only, I don't plan on distributing it or selling it. 

Again, if you'd like to be an interviewee for my documentary, please reply to this post or email me at sbernadette10@gmail.com! Merci beaucoup et bonne journée! 

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7848709887?profile=RESIZE_710xWhen asked if the story—her story—depicted in the recently published memoir and ode to the immigrant experience, Immigrant Dreams, created in her a feeling of solidarity and connection to the immigrants of today, Barbara Goldowsky responds, "Absolutely."

Ms. Goldowsky's personal narrative takes us from Dachau, Germany, where she was born, to Alsace-Lorraine, where her family lived between 1941 and 1945, and then back to Dachau as World War Two and Hitler’s dictatorship were about to end. After emigration to the United States in 1950, Goldowsky’s young adulthood was spent with already-settled family in Chicago. She attended public schools and junior college and then studied at the University of Chicago where she became interested in creative writing and literature, inspired by the Beat poets published by The Chicago Review. Later, while raising a family and living on Long Island, New York in the  1980s  she was able to build the writing career that had germinated many years before.

In recalling her youth in war-torn and then liberated Dachau, a town most known for the infamous concentration camp located on its outskirts, Ms. Goldowsky describes "a charming medieval town" that was an artists' colony for decades, evident in the streets named after painters and writers. About 11 miles from Munich, which contained an artists' colony of its own, Dachau was within the American Zone of occupation following the war.

At the gymnasium (academic high school) she attended in Munich, English language instruction was offered and Goldowsky learned the basics of grammar and vocabulary.   After arriving in Chicago, she was able to spearhead her family's effort to learn the language. Her mother did not speak English and her younger brother had barely learned to read and write in German when the family arrived in the U.S.

This learning helped, but didn't insulate her from the difficulties of acclimating to American life when she, aged 14, her brother, aged 8, and her single mother moved to Chicago, sponsored by her aunt and uncle.

The author's high school in Chicago had a newspaper, but she didn't join out of a reticence to express herself in a native setting in her new language. She soon, though, became enamored of journalism and newspapers by reading The Chicago Tribune, which her uncle subscribed to and "was always there," she remembers. "I was very up on the news." 

Her next step was, in Ms. Goldowsky's words, "another immigrant dream fulfilled", when  she received a scholarship, "thanks to a very perceptive and wonderful journalism teacher" at her junior college. The scholarship, a foreign concept to her, provided an education her family could not have otherwise afforded.

Majoring in political science with the aim of becoming a news reporter,  she attended the University of Chicago, and continued her discovery of American and British literature which had started as a young adult. Although she was familiar with all of Grimm’s fairy tales, American children’s literature was still foreign to her. “I had to catch up with Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn,” she recalls. When she moved on to reading the poetry of T.S. Eliot, she encountered a language that, she termed, was "so rich."

"I'm not sure I put it in words for myself, but I really enjoyed reading in English," the author of Immigrant Dreams says. Of Eliot's works, she says, "I understood maybe half, but I saw the cadences and the beauty of it."

At her university's bookstore, she picked up a copy of the school literary magazine, The Chicago Review, and started reading contemporary writers such as Allen Ginsberg and the Beats. She found the courage to walk into the magazine's offices and obtain a position as a staff member in the late 1950s. 

Just like that, she was "plunged into the Beat revolution". Without question this was an eye-opening experience, especially for a new immigrant learning the ropes of her new country's language and literature. 

She acknowledges this and observes that it was "a real education" because "the language was changing." This was thanks to authors like William S. Burroughs, whom The Chicago Review wanted to publish but ran into difficulty with the university’s administration due to the controversial nature of his writings.

Her firsthand account of this era, which saw her and other editors resign from the school magazine to found their own countercultural journal, is detailed in a piece she wrote for The Chicago Review in 2019, a memoir entitled Beat Poets and Zen Buddhists on the Midway.

Returning to why Ms. Goldowsky has written this memoir, Immigrant Dreams, now, she tells me a story about her late husband.

As she's gotten to be a grandmother, her family has told her "Oh, you've had such an interesting life. You should write all that up!" When she reflected on it, she thought her story would be nice for her family to read, but didn't think it would benefit a wider public.

"But then came the election of 2016. “And shortly after, we began to see this poisonous climate of hatred against immigrants. The Muslim ban; parents tried to hold on the their children as they were dragged away [at the U.S.-Mexico border]."

"One day," she says "I walked past the photo of my late husband that hangs in my room," explaining that she always says hi to him there.

"I suddenly heard what he would say. In my mind, he would have said, 'Okay, you have a problem. So, state the problem, look at it and, then, don't sit there—do something!” 

"So his mantra was take action."

As a result, Ms. Goldowsky said she saw what action she could take, and that was to write. She began to cull the autobiographical essays she had started to write on Long Island, all the while thinking of herself and her brother coming over in 1950 and how different their story would have been had it happened now.

She wondered aloud to me how things would have been different if she and her family had been people of color, unable to integrate more easily into a predominantly white society once they learned English.

But still she thought, "You know, that's what I can do. I can write."

And Immigrant Dreams was born.

Article written by Andrew Palmacci for NewYorkinFrench on September 6, 2020

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Music Box Films is proud to announce that French director Justine Triet’s darkly comic psychodrama SIBYL, a selection of the Cannes, Toronto and New York Film Festivals, will be released in New York and Los Angeles on Friday, September 11 at Film at Lincoln Center and Laemmle's Virtual Cinemas, followed by other top markets throughout the US.

Sibyl (Virginie Efira), a jaded psychotherapist, abruptly decides to leave her practice to return to her first passion: writing. But her newest patient Margot (Adèle Exarchopoulos), a troubled up-and-coming actress, proves to be a source of inspiration that is far too tempting. Fascinated to the point of obsession, Sibyl becomes increasingly involved in Margot’s tumultuous life while negotiating her own demons.

In her second collaboration with rising star Virginie Efira, writer-director Justine Triet has created heroines of intense complexity, seamlessly intertwining past and present while maintaining a delicate balance between drama and acidic farce.

Justine Triet graduated from Paris’ École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts. Following documentary and narrative short films, she made her debut feature with La Bataille de Solférino (Age of Panic), which earned her a César nomination for Best First Film. Her second feature, In Bed with Victoria, starring Virginie Efira, opened the 2016 Cannes Critics’ Week and received five César nominations including Best Film and Best Actress. SIBYL is her third feature.

"Justine Triet's second highly pleasurable collaboration with actress Virginie Efira is a witty, slinky psychodrama… Seals the arrival of Efira … A first-class leading lady of consistently expanding range and élan — with the emotional honesty and deadpan pluck to pull off the more outrageous character turns." - Guy Lodge, Variety

For more information about Virtual Cinemas please visit:

https://www.musicboxfilms.com/film/sibyl/
https://www.filmlinc.org/films/sibyl/
https://www.laemmle.com/film/sibyl

 

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A bilingual french contemporary art preschool is currently seeking a full time preschool 2's teacher for its Greenwich village location for 2020-2021 Academic year.

The ideal candidate is organized, patient, gentle, and has prior experience working in preschool and early childhood education, special aid experience is a plus.
Work hours are from 8:30-4:30, Monday through Friday, plus weekly meetings and parent tours. Yearly salary based on experience.

• Able to successfully manage class to maintain a positive, nurturing and respectful
learning environment
• Plan, execute, and collaborate with other teachers on preschool curriculum and arts-integrated lesson planning on daily basis.
• Weekly observation, assessment and evaluation of students.
• Be in charge of safety and cleanliness in the classroom at all times
• Take daily attendance, keep accident reports, and organize monthly fire drills
• Prepare preschool for students’ arrival and clean up when school is finished
• Supervising the classroom when the other teachers are out of the room or absent.
• Manage all pick up, drop off, and visitors.
• Facilitate nap time and assist with meals
• Plan, Chaperone, field trips and organize related paperworks in collaboration with director.
• Organize and re-stock classroom, supplies, and storage area as needed
• Manage general housekeeping and cleaning of classroom and kitchen
• Supervise and organize recycling program with all the parents for art projects.
• Attend school Open Houses (usually afterschool) and conduct student interviews

Required Skills & Qualifications:

• Bachelor in early childhood education (birth to grade 2) or currently in study plan.
• Prior experience working in preschool and early childhood education, special aid experience is a plus
• Working papers and visa for non-US citizens
• Fingerprinting and FBI background Check required.
• First aid and CPR certified.
• Familiarity with progressive educational philosophies such as Reggio Emilia, a plus.
• Patience and flexibility; ability to relate to young children and communicate with parents.

Interested applicants should send their cover letter and resume at info@lpeny.com. For more information about the school, please visit our website at www.lpeny.com. No phone calls, please

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EFNY program is designed for Children from K to 8th grade interested in learning French and the diversity of Francophone culture. EFNY offers French as a Second Language, French for native speakers, and a variety of French culture classes! 

Class offerings will run daily 3-4:30PM* from September 21, 2020 to January 29, 2021

*Class start & end times subject to modification based on NYC DOE school schedule

Classes are organized by grade in small groups of up to 12 students/class maximum

Online EFNY semester tuition will be $500/class 

For more information & registration, see http://www.efny.net/efny-line-fall-2020/

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EFNY program is designed for Children from K to 8th grade interested in learning French and the diversity of Francophone culture. EFNY offers French as a Second Language, French for native speakers, and a variety of French culture classes! 

Class offerings will run daily 3-4:30PM* from September 21, 2020 to January 29, 2021

*Class start & end times subject to modification based on NYC DOE school schedule

Classes are organized by grade in small groups of up to 12 students/class maximum

Online EFNY semester tuition will be $500/class 

For more information & registration, see http://www.efny.net/efny-line-fall-2020/

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7848728480?profile=original"Within Reach" is an Immersive Interactive Cinematic Art Installation conceived and Directed by Laia Cabrera & Isabelle DuvergerInteractive Design by Aniol Saurina Masó | Original music by Nana Simopoulos

Cinematography and Editing by Laia Cabrera & Isabelle Duverger | Additional footage by Ignacio Garcia-Bustelo

"Within Reach" is an interactive art installation about transformation, reconnecting with the origin, nature and our relationship to it, created by filmmaker Laia Cabrera and visual artist Isabelle Duverger in collaboration with interactive designer Aniol Saurina Masó and composer Nana Simopoulos.Conceived as a seamless projection mapping design with full gesture responsive interactivity, “Within Reach” invites the audience to actively enter the heart of the piece creating a story that unfolds across a series of immersive interactive scenarios. The installation is a sensory experience thought the elements, from the earth to the skies, from liquid shapes to seeds and visual metaphors, and the principle of change and transformation, where the line is blurred between the physical and the digital world, between the real and the imaginary.We are far, minuscule, looking from above, but we are actors, actively morphing and shaping what we see. The sea is moving the trees, from the molecules to the exploration of nature and its fruits. “Within Reach” explores the soul of nature, it’s quietness and its power, fertility trough avatars being the fruits and seeds to the infinitesimal and the microscopic on a journey of landscapes and its enchanting beauty. The human presence is only visible at the beginning at gen end as a minuscule glimpse of looking at the skies, where coffee grains and bubbles are rain on our dreams.The audience can affect change, create an avatar of themselves and discover ways to interact with the installation, embody the different storylines and share the experience with each other.

“Within Reach” premiered in Jersey City at the Art Wall Coolvines Powerhouse on August 11, 2020 and is currently in view until September 30, 2020.Art Wall Coolvines Powerhouse, 350 Warren St Jersey City, NJ

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The lived personal and professional experience of Tammy Oberg De La Garza and Alyson Lavigne did much to spur them to the thinking, writing and teaching that has produced their first book together, Salsa Dancing in Gym Shoes.

Buoyed by personal narratives from Latinx students-turned-educators and scholars, as well as the authors' own journeys as the spouses of Mexican-Americans, Drs. Oberg De La Garza and Lavigne currently serve as Professors of Education at Roosevelt University in Chicago and Utah State University, respectively.

Plenty of pedagogically sound material and information is injected into this very readable tome, which takes the work of these university professors, who met while working at Roosevelt University, in cross-cultural communication and intercultural competence and mixes it with reflections from Latinos who began on the student side of the classroom and have become practitioners in their own right. The resulting admixture is distilled into a case for more equity and accessibility in K-12 and university education across languages and cultures, not only in the U.S., but applied worldwide. 

And this is exactly what our current times and the future of pedagogy require. When asked about this—specifically whether their book is even more relevant now than when they started writing it, Dr. Lavigne responded: "Yes, absolutely. I think one of the shifts that I'm seeing in working with principals and teachers is that equity is now the first question that they're accessing and that's in regards to Black Lives Matter. In combination with Covid-19 happening, there's no way that this issue [equity] can be the second or third or fourth question that we ask as a district or schools. Teachers are asking: "Is there equitable access to resources?"

"I'm currently in Utah and [there's the question of] Native communities and to what extent they have access to even the basic health needs during all of this, in addition to the things that we're requiring for remote learning like computers. And, maybe having folks at home who can support that learning and problem solve issues with them. It is long overdue for this to be the lens through which we approach learning."

Dr. Oberg De La Garza added, "Leading up to this book, the work that Alyson and I did before, was really exploring how students perceive care from teachers. Until they know you care, they don't care what you know.

"You could be a phenomenal teacher, but if there's a break in the relationship between the teacher and the student, the student is not going to benefit as much as the student who is in sync with the teacher, who feels like the teacher and they are one and the same."

The title Salsa Dancing in Gym Shoes is itself a metaphor for bringing one's own approach into a teaching situation with Latino children, particularly as a white educator, and having those implicit biases and methods hinder the learning attempted by those students.

To illustrate both this title and theme of their book as well as the importance of learning compassionate teaching, Drs. Oberg De La Garza and Lavigne cited their favorite examples of pivotal educational moments shared by the Latinx authors whose stories add vibrance to the book.

Dr. Oberg De La Garza was struck by Sarah Rafael García's account of being put on the spot to pronounce the English word "chair" and producing "ch-ch-chair". The experience was made worse by Ms. Garcia's teacher forcing her to stand up in front of the class to do this as an English Language Learner. Ms. García had a panic attack as a result. She has since become an educator who uses this personal memory in her own work and personal life to better approach socio-emotional learning and bilingual learners' specific challenges and vulnerabilities.

For her part, Dr. Lavigne mentioned the writing of Laura Guzmán-DuVernois and her class discussion prompt in a heritage language classroom of the different ways to say "kite" across the Latino world. This meta-linguistic awareness, the chance to acknowledge that even within one language there are a variety of norms, was the gem for Dr. Lavigne. Even in her own home, her children ask about different alphabets and pronunciations among and within languages, which she loves to talk about with them.

To watch kids realize that there are differences between languages and discover that different languages align in different ways to mathematical thinking and reading— is a gift, according to Dr. Lavigne.

Both authors have, in addition to their university work, experience in K-12 education, Dr. Oberg De La Garza in teaching diverse classrooms in Chicago and Dr. Lavigne in observing classroom teachers in Arizona. They agreed that there's a disconnect between what teachers are studying and what's being taught in higher education and what K-12 teachers are doing in the classroom. The two worlds, the authors feel, could be more connected and embedded.

And this is not just a U.S. problem. With another colleague, Dr. Lavigne collected data in the Netherlands on teaching practices and found that K-12 teachers desire more support from universities and other players in teaching diverse youth. She states "There's a gap between K-12 and university teaching. K-12 teachers are doing really important work that no one's studying [at the university level]."

Article written by Andrew Palmacci for NewYorkinFrench on August 4, 2020

Order now: Paperback, Hardcover, eBook

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Interested in a new French Dual Language Program in East Village for next year 2021/2022?

Join CEC1, CEC2 and CEC3 on Zoom Monday, July 27 at 7PM 

Dual Language Chairs, Superintendents and Elected Officials will discuss establishing a K-5 / K-8 French and Spanish Dual Language School.

Advocacy makes a impact. Take the opportunity to be heard.

Join us !

Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 891 3113 3966

Password: 161969

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89131133966?pwd=WTJsVyttWGlMTkR2dUF3Y25SWmhhQT09

If you know someone who may be interested in this FREE BILINGUAL PROGRAM, please forward this opportunity!

Thank you for your support.

NYC District 2 French Dual Language Program

https://www.facebook.com/groups/593786378077031 

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Club OUIstiti!

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Bonjour tout le monde! Je m'appelle Laetitia Donnet. Je suis institutrice de maternelle et prof de français ici à New York. Comme pour beaucoup mon année scolaire s'est terminée en ligne. L'idée d'enseigner virtuellement était intimidante au début mais on a réussi à le faire avec de très bons résultats. Puisque toute ma vie professionnelle a continué en ligne, la période de confinement m'a donné l'occasion d'entreprendre un gros projet : une chaîne YouTube en français pour les enfants ainsi que des cours d'éveil et de bricolage en français sur Zoom. 
 
La série principale de la  chaîne "Club OUIstiti" s'appelle "Une histoire et une chanson". Chaque épisode contient un exercice de vocabulaire, une histoire lue à voix haute et, finalement, une chanson en rapport avec le thème de l'épisode.
 
Les cours sur Zoom accompagnent les vidéos et sont supplémentés par des flashcards et des livres de coloriage. Nous nous retrouvons chaque semaine pour lire, bricoler, chanter et danser ensemble. Les cours sont le lundi, mercredi et jeudi à 11h30. Le paiement est par Venmo et comme bon vous semble :) 6823037060?profile=RESIZE_710x
 
Pour participer, vous pouvez me contacter par email à ouistitinyc@gmail.com ou sur instagram @ouistiti_nyc. J'ai hâte de faire votre connaissance!
 
Merci et à bientôt!
Laetitia
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6731387286?profile=RESIZE_710xIn the 20th and 21st centuries, it is often the United States that is cited as the country most effective at engaging in cultural diplomacy. Or, the U.S. is touted as a major exporter of "soft power" to the rest of the world. But, in Jane Flatau Ross' Two Centuries of French Education in New York, it is France's efforts to spread influence abroad with culture—in this case education—that is given the spotlight. Dr. Ross, through a look at her own internationally flavored life and long career at the Lycée Français in New York, examines the global network of French schools abroad. She focuses on the subject through the lens of K-12 schools in New York from the early 18th century on, particularly focusing on the 20th-century Lycée Français and an earlier precursor.

Professor of History at Ohio State University, Alice L. Conklin offered the following in praise of Dr. Ross: “In this wonderfully engaging book Jane Ross restores to view a little-known dimension of French educational rayonnement in the US.  A must read for anyone seeking to understand the cultural ambitions of global France today.”

“Jane Ross has written a marvelous history of the Lycée Français de New York, bringing to that analysis deep insight gleaned from three decades teaching in the school,” added Herrick Chapman, Professor of History and French Studies at New York University.

It is true that this work of combined history and memoir is unique, in that few scholars have looked at specific “global school” models. The author’s case study of the Lycée Français de New York (1935-present) and other French schools in New York explores how the French national education systems functions not only beyond the hexagon of France itself, but also beyond the strictly colonial “civilizing mission” that was advanced by French schools in both French colonies and former colonies.

The recently published Two Centuries of French Education in New York was born out of Dr. Ross' work in the International Education doctoral program at NYU’s Steinhardt School. While engaged in her studies there, she initially thought her dissertation thesis would revolve around heritage language learning. She had founded the French Heritage Language Program, an educational resource for Francophone immigrants to the U.S. shortly after her retirement from a career of 30 years at the Lycée.

It was only when the teacher and scholar began to pull material together for her doctoral thesis that she realized that the story of French schools and the history of the Lycée in New York would be fertile ground for research and eventually for publication. That suited Dr. Ross well, as she was "more comfortable with an historical perspective as opposed to an anthropological and statistics-based approach." She was, in fact, educated as an historian, holding undergraduate degrees in History and French from Swarthmore College.

Upon completion of her thesis, one of her committee members suggested she add some personal elements to the writing. This advice was based on that professor's own scholarly work on peace and conflict studies in Afghanistan, in which she interspersed theory with anecdotes from her time on the ground in Kabul.

It took some adjustment of tack, but Dr. Ross states, "I think the most enjoyable parts [of writing the book] were the snippets of personal family history that I added after the thesis was completed. I felt I had more freedom to make the book more personal and hopefully more interesting for readers who might find the more technical or academic aspects less vibrant."

On the contrary, the distilling of French educational history in New York is compelling, particularly including the profile of the 19th-century Economical School that gives insight into the operation of an international, bilingual school in the early days of the American Republic. In fact, Dr. Ross "greatly enjoyed the research into [this] school."

One of the first sections of the book lays out the origins of a global French education system and, to be sure, French education itself. This posed the most challenging research for the author and educator: "The most difficult parts were those concerning the technicalities of the French government's relationship to the schools abroad. While the schools themselves," she adds, "and specifically the Lycée Français de New York, each have a history of their own, they fit into an administrative structure that almost seemed to exist in a parallel universe."

While at the Lycée, the writer of Two Centuries of French Education New York reflected that she "never thought [she] was a part of this "cultural machine", a machine of cultural diplomacy to be exact, which was a true global phenomenon."

"But, I was," she observes. "That was why the Cambodians were there; why the Iranians came after the Shah fell; why Africans were there and why they were sometimes not there." 

“The Lycée creates a cultural outpost with people singing La Marseillaise. It is important to France. I just thought it was a school."

Dr. Ross found working with the international student body the most enjoyable and rewarding part of her 30+ years at the school. "I loved being part of the school, the variety of families and interests they had." 

She taught Turkish students who escaped over borders and walked through deserts to eventually reach the shores of the U.S. Other students were Africans who were the children of diplomats or the children of the diplomats' chauffeurs. Even the French families from the Hexagon were diverse in many ways. She tells me she remains close friends with some of the families.

The ultimate reward for teaching at the Lycée Français for Dr. Ross was, in her words, the "feeling that I had an impact on students who would be [living] all over the globe."”

Lastly, I ask her to sum up the French philosophy of education. She responds, "Education is the creation of citizens."

Then, her own philosophy. She responds unequivocally: "Education makes us human."

Article written by Andrew Palmacci for NewYorkinFrench on July 9, 2020

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6505694258?profile=RESIZE_710xBorn on the West Coast and growing up in San Diego, California, Deana Sobel Ledeman may seem to have been far removed from a cozy, Upper West Side, Manhattan apartment, but that's exactly where this award-winning cartoonist and children's book author created some of her fondest childhood memories and developed a love for children's literature. During visits cross-coast to her parent's native New York City as a child, Lederman spent time at her grandmother's apartment, reading books such as the Madeline series (the children's classic by Ludwig Bemelmans) in a nook in the room where her own mother grew up. "In New York City, you just feel so alive," she recalled.

"That joyfulness that we experience in childhood, I still really enjoy that feeling. I've kept that with me as I grow older."

Indeed, New York City—and cities in general—have been a major source of inspiration in Lederman's work since she began penning comics as a student at UC-Berkeley and later professionally on the East Coast. This love of cities and the spirit of exploration and discovery they spark, especially in children, continues with the suite of three children's books this author and illustrator has recently published with TBR Books. The poignant yet whimsically rendered books provide a way for parents to talk to their kids about the Covid-19 pandemic and shutdown. 

Now translated into three other languages, the trilogy of Masks!The Sewing Lesson and Noah Henry: A Rainbow Story all take place in an urban setting. They deal, respectively, with kids experiencing the reopening; non-traditional families making sacrifices for essential workers; and a real-life quarantine phenomenon that took place in Brooklyn, NY. Noah Henry, whose protagonist is named after the two young sons of a friend of Lederman's residing in that New York City borough, chronicles a story of inspiration and hope coming from le confinement. In the book, a child sees rainbows drawn by other kids on their windows throughout the neighborhood, made as a sign of better times to come when everyone could all be together again. 

Reported by the international press, the practice of kids placing rainbows on their windows actually began in Italy and Europe at the outset of school closures there, but soon spread to the U.S. and Canada. In Brooklyn, Lederman's friend experienced this happening through the eyes of her young boys. "Whenever we face times of adversity, there are really inspirational stories that come out of it," observes Lederman, writer and illustrator of this book trilogy. She spoke to me of inspiration from her own family history, where one set of her grandparents escaped Europe during World War II and her grandfather on the other side of her family served as an American fighter pilot.  

Returning to the present, the author cites the importance of and difficulty faced by essential workers and "even people sitting at home and sewing masks for everyone," the central subject of The Sewing Lesson. Despite the crises so far in 2020, she states, "There's a lot of greatness—the right kind of greatness—happening." Lederman's trilogy, known as Rainbows, Masks and Ice Cream, is her latest artistic and literary contribution to the world, this one particularly for families, during the current moment of uncertainty. This trio was drawn not with pen and ink or oil paints (usually her media of choice), but on an iPad. This mother of two children, who is also a former member of the New York City Department of Education's communications team, noted that the digital device was ideal for sketching and creating while she was caring for her youngsters. Her older son, Aiden, even helped her do a read-aloud of Noah Henry in a YouTube video recorded soon after the book, the first written of the trilogy, was finished. The clip was later shared online by both the National Children's Museum and the Minnesota Children's Museum.

While all three are focused on life as lived by children and families throughout the world amidst a global pandemic, shutdown and calls for greater respect for people of color, Lederman's series of children's books seeks to fill a much-need role in contemporary literature and public discourse. The author, reflecting her stories and current times, wonders "if these stories are so timely, how long will they be relevant?" "And it seems, I'm starting to think, they might be relevant for longer than I originally thought. Because, even once things get better, we will probably want to remember what happened."

Finally, she hopes her books provide a means, later on, to look back on our present situation and come away with insights and understanding: "There will be things we learn from this time that we don't realize right now. We'll have much more perspective." For children and families the world over, in different languages, these stories offer a way to explore difficult themes while celebrating life and keeping alive the joyfulness that every child deserves.

Article written by Andrew Palmacci for NewYorkinFrench.net on July 1, 2020

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