All Posts (2997)

Sort by

Je ningue, tu ningues, il ningue...

Le verbe ninguer (prononcer comme swinguer) n'existe pas encore dans le dictionnaire. Mais avec New York in French, le premier Ning de la communauté francophone de New York, ce mot devrait rentrer dans notre vocabulaire très rapidement. En 10 jours, déjà 950 membres se sont inscrits sur "New York in French", une sorte de blog gratuit, apolitique, non-commercial et communautaire, ouvert à toutes les personnes intéressées par la langue française et ceux qui la parlent, qu'ils habitent à New York où dans ses grands environs. Qu'est-ce qu'un Ning ? Un Ning est une plateforme qui permet aux utilisateurs de créer leur propre réseau social. Ning est semblable à Facebook ou MySpace mais laisse à l'utilisateur l'entière liberté de concevoir, modifier, modérer, innover, rassembler autour d'un thème précis. Un Ning offre de nombreux outils innovants, collaboratifs, sans spam et partageurs d'informations dans le but d'échanger, informer, contribuer et débattre au sujet de questions et centres d'intérêts divers. Le mot ning veut dire "paix" en chinois mais la plateforme est américaine. Elle a été créée en Californie par Marc Andreessen and Gina Bianchini. Ning est la troisième compagnie de Andreessen qui a déjà lancé Netscape et Opsware. Ning n'est pas encore connu dans les pays francophones mais l'exemple de New York in French, créé par Fabrice Jaumont, devrait faire des émules qui sauront rapidement exploiter les possibilités illimitées de ce type d'outils. Ning ne requiert aucune compétence informatique et toute personne peut créer son réseau social gratuitement. Un Ning permet au membre d'un réseau de tchater, de bloguer, d'échanger collectivement, de créer des groupes de discussions, d'afficher des photos, des vidéos, des fichiers sons, des documents, etc. "Un Ning comme New York in French permet avant tout de rassembler la communauté francophone autour d'enjeux comme l'ouverture de classes bilingues dans les écoles publiques ou l'enseignement du français aux Etats-Unis", déclare Jaumont. Le Ning de New York in French est, en effet, centré sur l'éducation, l'apprentissage du français, la Francophonie et la francophilie à New York et aux alentours. "C'est en ninguant, qu'on devient plus connecté, plus informé, plus collectif donc plus efficace, capable d'avoir un impact plus important sur le monde qui nous entoure et plus à même de réaliser les initiatives qui nous tiennent à coeur." précise Jaumont. Pour s'inscrire, il faut se rendre sur http://nycfrench.ning.com
Read more…
Amuse-Bouche No. 4: Nissarts and Ch'tis -- Separated by Language -by Julia FreyThe French tend to ridicule all regional accents but their own.We are exploring PACA (Provence–Alpes du Sud–Côte d’Azur), our new neighborhood, and I discover that les Provençaux speak French so you can understand them! They pronounce all the letters, including some that aren’t in the word. And they’re volubiles. In Vallauris (pronounced valorisse), it’s no use being in a hurry with Jean-Marc, the boulanger, who makes wonderful pain (pronounced pang). He just taps his head and says: “Mais vous n’êtes pas bieng?” (“Is there something wrong with you?” Translation into normal French: “Ça ne va pas, la tête?” Implicitly: “Are you nuts? What’s the rush?”) When they don't want a non-local to understand, Jean-Marc and his wife, both born in Nice, speak Nissart (the Nice dialect) to each other.As elsewhere, non-local accents can provoke negative reactions, even if studies show most French speakers can’t accurately recognize regional accents. The French really only distinguish between le Nord and le Midi (south). But they tend to dislike the other guy’s accent.When Brigitte noticed l’accent du Midi was replacing the parigot (Paris street slang) influence on my American accent, she fed me her stéréotypes about les gens du Midi: voleurs (thieving), menteurs (prone to exaggeration), paresseux (lazy). She quoted a so-called Provençal proverb: “Si tu as une envie de travail, assieds-toi et attends que ça passe!” (If you feel like getting a job, sit down until you get over it.) Wanda, une Niçoise transplanted to Paris, laughed. “Julia, at least you’re bien placée (in the right place) to know if we deserve our bad reputation”.In 1905, one of the first French B.D.s (bandes dessinées, i.e., comic strips) invented Bécassine (the word means “snipe,” as in the bird), a plouc (hick) who arrives in Paris wearing her coiffe bretonne (traditional Brittany lace cap). Comically highlighting the alienation between city and country, peasant and bourgeois, she became so popular that one of the definitions for bécassine in the Trésor de la Langue Française is “femme stupide ou ridicule”. Bretons were long offended by her image but now view Bécassine with nostalgia, as representing the unspoiled good-heartedness of France in times gone by. She was honored by a French stamp in 2005.Astérix (a series of 50 French B.D.s and films) constantly parodies regional stereotypes, ridiculing preconceptions like Normands who never give you a straight answer, Gascons who never keep their word, cheapskate Auvergnats and, of course, Southerners who are always taking la sieste! The caricatural hostility between Paris and province (Provence is a French province), and the regional pride (and cuisine) of Corsica, Normandy, Brittany, Gascony or Auvergne become pretexts to get children—and adults—to laugh at their own prejudices while teaching them geography. (For some reason the French often claim to be hopeless in geography. Given that they think France is shaped like a hexagon, I’d say they’re more hopeless in geometry.)The wildly successful comedy Bienvenue Chez les Ch’tis—pronounced sh-tee—(Welcome to the Sticks), has sold more tickets than any French-made film in history, including France’s most expensive film to date, Astérix aux Jeux Olympiques. At this writing, approximately 25 percent of France had been to see this gentil (charming) farce about a postal clerk from sunny Provence forcibly relocated to a small town in France’s far north. Shot in Bergues (pronounced “berk”—which means “yuck”—pop. 4,200), not far from Lille, it uses gags about torrential rains starting at the border and hard-drinking, unemployed rednecks who eat bread slathered in stinky cheese dipped in chicory-flavored coffee, while speaking an incomprehensible dialect called Ch’timi. Nicknamed “les Ch’tis”, they replace “s” with “ch” (you know that singer Chtevie Wonder?), call their buddies “biloute” (regularly confused with biroute, slang for the male sex organ) and end every sentence with hein? (huh? pronounced a little like a duck quacking). All this slapstick has an underlying message: le Nord can be a wonderful place. “People arrive in tears”, someone says, “and leave in tears”. Although the humor, given the accents and dialect, is untranslatable, director and star Dany Boon figured out how to use the “fish out of water” plot for a future U.S. remake— simply transfer a disgraced New York cadre (executive) to a small town in Texas.© 2009 Julia Frey
Read more…
Amuse Bouche No. 2: What's in a name? (bis): Le Name Droppingby Julia FreyEven as they dump conventional first names (see Amuse-bouche No. 1), the French remain obsessed with le nom de familleCamille’s bobo (bourgeois-bohème) parents never got around to getting married. Déclarée (legally recognized) by her father, she bears his surname (not surnom -- which means nickname). But seventeen, and status-conscious, Camille wanted the ultimate snobisme, a two-part name. Her mother’s nom de famille includes the preposition de (known as the particule). World-wide, les snobs are impressed by la particule. French snobs even distinguish between noblesse d'Empire, whose titles merely were bestowed by Napoleon, and ancien Régime nobles from before the Révolution. So Camille combined both her parents’ last names (which I have changed to protect the guilty). She’s now dite (called) Camille Bidule de Machin-Chouette (Thingamajig of Whatsherface). Not everyone is impressed. Bobos and hoi polloi treat double names like clumsy furniture: un nom à tiroir (a name with a drawer in it), à rallonge (with a table extension), à charnière (with a hinge), or qui se devisse (which can be unscrewed). She can always unscrew -- It’s just a nom d’usage. Legally she’s still Camille Bidule.Although it’s considered vulgar to ask what you do for a living, in France people want to know your family tree before they decide if they like you. In some circles, being just plain folks (petites gens - mysteriously feminine in this context) or du peuple (proletarian) is a source of pride. It’s particularly chic to say you come from paysans (peasants) or ouvriers, (workers) if you’re really an intellectuel/le.Certain women will marry a man who is cruel, stupid, unethical and unemployed just for his aristocratic name. Rich American families like the Vanderbilts used to purchase titles for their daughters by marrying them to impoverished nobles. Less well-heeled social climbers, like Honoré de Balzac’s father, just slipped in la particule when they thought nobody was looking.These days, you can’t casually adopt a new nom de famille. Too bad if you’re stuck with a moniker like Marc Deposay (homonym: marque déposée -- trademark) , not to mention Poubelle (garbage can) or Guillotine, both named for their inventors. Luckily the death penalty has been abolished, and poubelles are no longer allowed in the streets for fear of terrorist bombs. All you find when you look for a place to park your gum is a lidded metal hoop with a green plastic bag attached.And don’t think marriage can save a French woman from an unfortunate name. Her identity papers bear her maiden name all her life, adding the name of her husband along with details of her marital status. Thus Aude Wessel (homonym: eau de vaisselle -- dishwater), when she marries, becomes Aude Wessel épouse (wife of) Fosse (drainage ditch). If the marriage dissolves, she is Aude Wessel divorcée Fosse, or if he kicks the bucket, she’s Aude Wessel veuve Fosse. If she remarries, she’s still Aude Wessel, now épouse Bidet.You may envy les people (pronounce: laypeePOLE) -- the folks you see in les médias, but a famous name is also a mixed blessing. Sara was once married to Pablo Picasso’s son Claude. “It was astonishing,” she said. “From the moment I became Sara Picasso, I ceased to exist. People only cared about my name.“ (Picasso himself complained people bought his paintings for the signature.) She was very young. The marriage didn’t last. Sara existed again. The name is still worth money. In 1998, Claude sold the signature to the French auto maker Citroën, and named their mid-sized model the “Xsara Picasso”. Sara assumes he named the car after her: ex-Sara Picasso!©Julia Frey 2009P.S. Julia Frey (pronounced: fry), an ex-French professor, was amused to discover her students called her “French Frey”.
Read more…

Auteure d'origine normande publiée chez Lulu, Virginie Sommet habite tout naturellement à Big Apple, où elle mène une vie semble-t-il trépidante, toujours accompagnée de sa bicyclette de type hollandais fabriquée en 1945. Son livre Only in New york, darling ! est le carnet de bord halluciné de Virginie dans les méandres du quotidien de New York City, un témoignage drôle, intimiste et touchant. Déterminée et positive quoi qu'il arrive, Virginie raconte ses aventures dans un style inimitable qui oscille entre titi parisien, artiste engagée et Barbarella sexy. Elle offre au lecteur un récit sincère, tendre, servi par un sens aigu de l'observation. La Normande observe sans répit l'univers impitoyable qui l'entoure, questionne sans relâche tous ceux qu'elle croise dans la grande et haute ville. Les lecteurs sont invités à suivre Virginie à New York pour, eux aussi, "devenir ce qu'ils sont".Only in New York, Darling ! raconte ses premiers pas, ses galères, petits boulots, rencontres improbables, en somme une vision du New York du milieu des années quatre-vingt dix, avant la monstrueuse vague sécuritaire qui suivit les attentats du 11 septembre 2001. « C’est suite justement aux attentats que j’ai décidé d’écrire ce livre, » raconte Virginie. « Je voulais urgemment faire partager mon amour pour New York, rappeler sa richesse, décrire la fascination qu’exercent sur moi ses habitants, ses quartiers, son énergie unique. J’ai rédigé le livre tous les matins pendant six mois, après une séance de zazen (méditation japonaise), puis une fois le premier jet effectué, les corrections et la composition furent longs, mobilisant proches et amis pour obtenir une œuvre qui soit la plus singulière et personnelle possible. »En huit ans de vie new-yorkaise, Virginie est devenue une artiste en vue, exposant ses œuvres dans plusieurs galeries, d’abord dans des groupes, puis indépendamment. Elle a fini par monter sa propre galerie sur Canal Street, au cœur de Chinatown/Soho, appelée Collective Gallery 173-171, où elle expose des œuvres. Only in New York Darling ! se présente comme un récit initiatique qui se dévore ou se picore selon l’appétit. De courts paragraphes sont entrecoupés par des poèmes, des illustrations, à la manière d’un collage artistique.
Read more…

3438627953?profile=original


I had to ask France Aimée where she got a patriotic name like Beloved France. (What if my parents had named me Beloved United States?) Not patriotism, she said. Her mother is Aimée; her grandmother was named France. Well, I observed, her grandmother was born in 1915. Another friend was named France during the German occupation in 1940. France Aimée’s name, she admitted, can provoke misunderstandings. Backpacking through Asia, she was paged at Jakarta airport: red carpet, flashing cameras, formal cocktail. It seems her Indonesian friend in Paris, to introduce her to someone local, had sent a telegram in English to a government official he knew, asking him to welcome “Miss France Aimée (...).” Very excited, the office had quickly set up a reception for...Miss France!
In 1964, when Gilbert Bécaud’s song “Nathalie” was a hit, some 32,000 babies were named Nathalie. This year, 40. In 1964, the most popular name for boys was Philippe. It ranks fifth overall for the past century. It lost favor just after World War II because the head of the Vichy régime was named Philippe Pétain, only to be salvaged in 1947, when Elizabeth II of England married Prince Philip. The truly class-conscious seek archaic names like Humbert or Isabeau. Or their Breton roots yield Baudouin or Guénaele. As in the United States, someone with a truly weird, unpronounceable name is usually from an old family—the kind that would do that to an innocent newborn.
A law passed on 11 germinal an XI (April Fool’s Day, 1803) said you had to choose a name from an official list which no one seems to be able to locate anymore. Legal names included all saints with birthdays in the calendrier grégorien (paradoxical since France was using the calendrier révolutionnaire at the time) plus certain historic figures, which ones I can only guess: Cleopatra? Nero? If you wanted to call your kid Friday, tough luck.
Desperate for individuation, people developed nicknames. As Boris Vian’s 1955 song “Je Suis Snob” explains, “Je m’appelle Patrick, mais on dit Bob.” Additionally, la bonne bourgeoisie hatched a flock of hyphenations: Jean-Paul, Jean-Pierre, Jean-Claude for boys; Marie-Paule, Marie-Pierre, Marie-Claude for girls. These even showed seasonal variations. Marie-Noëlle explains hers: “I was born in October, a bit too soon after my parent’s March wedding. My name hints at a Christmas birthday.” A 1966 law, bowing to these faits accomplis, also allowed mythological names (Medusa?) and regional names. Aude is poetic, but Aisne? Unfortunate homonyms for that French département (pronounced N) include aine (groin) and haine (hatred).
After a 1981 amnesty granting illegal immigrants citizenship, it wasn’t politiquement correct to force a saint’s name on a baby beur (French-born person of North African descent). Informally, parents could choose an alternative. Result: 1,784 boys named Mohamed.
But a name that might subject the child to ridicule risked a government veto. Results were inconsistent. Some bureaucrats rejected Marine: too nautical. For others, no problem. Since 1993, all rules are off. Last year Océane was really big.
Now you can name your kid anything you want. Unless some civil servant questions your taste in names. Then the “judge of family affairs” will choose a more appropriate one (Tuesday?). This creates new problems for psychologists. “What will happen to the child named Périphérique Nord, after the highway where his mother’s waters broke?” wonders François Bonifaix (Le Traumatisme du Prénom, 1995). Luckily, anyone over the age of 13 can legally change his or her name. Maybe I’ll change mine to Beloved United States.

Photo Credit: Jonas Cuénin


Amuse-Bouche No. 1: What’s in a Name? by Julia Frey
Naming your baby in France gets easier and riskier...

© Julia Frey 2012
p.s. This is the first of a series of "Amuse Bouche"-- humorous mouthfuls on the perplexities of French language and behavior by a former New Yorker now living in France. 

Read more…

Are we in Queens or what?

I know its going to sound redundant, but I am always amazed, how this town operates.This is the only place in the world, where you can hear Arabic, Korean, Russian, French, English sometime, or Yiddish at the same time, in the same street.Man, thats crazy but thats NY and I believe that why most of us never leave....Life would be too boring anywhere else....:).....MRK
Read more…

3438637637?profile=originalFilms on the Green is going… green! For its second year running, the popular free outdoor French film festival will feature movies about the environment and the beauty of the natural world. Following the remarkable success of last year’s inaugural “Films on the Green,” the Cultural Services of the French Embassy and the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation have once again joined forces to present a selection of seven critically acclaimed French films that will be screened every Friday at sunset in city parks during the months of June and July.

The festival’s opening night will see the U.S. premiere of Home, a feature documentary and global call-to-action directed by famed aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand. Shot entirely from the air, over a two-year period and in 54 different countries, Home gives viewers a new perspective on the planet, and a new awareness of the importance of protecting it. The screening will take place at Cedar Hill (79th St & 5th Ave) in Central Park, on Friday, June 5, in association with the United Nations Environment Programme. In a world first, Home will be released simultaneously in movie theaters, outdoors during public screenings, on DVD, online and on television, all on World Environment Day (June 5) in over 100 countries. Co-produced by Europacorp (Luc Besson’s production company) and Elzévir Films, and with the support of PPR Group, the movie will be distributed for free in a concerted effort to reach the widest possible audience.

 

Three other feature films will complete this environmental series of Films on the Green. The Academy Award winning March of the Penguins, the epic story of penguins fighting to survive in the Antarctic that made nature documentaries cool again, will be screened on Friday June 12. Microcosmos, a spectacular look into the tiny world of insects, with such highlights as bees collecting nectar, spiders wrapping their catch and a mosquito hatching, will play on June 19. Last but not least, The Big Blue, Luc Besson’s timeless and fascinating movie unfolding in the enigmatic world of free-diving, will be shown on Friday June 26. All three movies will be screened in Washington Square Park (see below for more details, including film capsules).

English-language screenings will take place every Friday of June and July (except July 3 and 31) at sunset (around 8:30pm, seating begins at 8:15pm), and will be free of charge.

Read more…
From: washkonet@yahoo.frTo: washkonet@yahoo.frSent: 5/31/2009 9:04:30 P.M. Eastern Daylight TimeSubj: O Mcezo* Cie - Communiqué de presseO Mcezo* CieCommuniqué de presseCensure culturelle et artistique. Interdiction de travail à l'Alliancefrançaise de Moroni pour une compagnie de théâtre à cause des positionspolitiques de son directeur artistique, Soeuf Elbadawi, sur l'intégritéterritoriale des Comores.La compagnie comorienne de théâtre O Mcezo* est interdite de travail àl'Alliance française de Moroni, suite à une performance artistique(gungu) réalisée le 13 mars dernier dans les rues de Moroni par SoeufElbadawi, son directeur. Une performance durant laquelle il s'estexprimé avec d'autres citoyens comoriens, des artistes et desjournalistes notamment, contre le viol de l'intégrité territoriale desComores, adoptant à cette occasion la même position que la vingtaine derésolutions de l'ONU condamnant la présence française à Mayotte.La décision de déprogrammer le travail de Soeuf Elbadawi et de sacompagnie à l'Alliance française de Moroni a été notifiée par uncourrier de son directeur, Jérôme gardon, en date du 28 mai 09. Ellefait suite au limogeage du plasticien comorien Seda de l'école française(Henri Matisse) pour avoir pris part à la même performance en marsdernier. La décision avait été prise, semble-t-il, au nom del'ambassadeur de France à Moroni. La décision de Jérôme Gardon engageainsi son institution, la seule qui soit équipée pour accueillir untravail de création et de diffusion dans le pays, dans un positionnementpolitique dont le but serait d'exclure de son lieu les artistescomoriens ayant une opinion contraire à l'autorité française. Ayantmanifesté son refus de la présence française à Mayotte, Soeuf Elbadawiest déprogrammé de l'affiche.Jérôme Gardon, directeur de l'Alliance française à Moroni, au nom de soncomité d'administration, accuse Soeuf Elbadawi d'avoir été «l'instigateur d'une manifestation politique violente ». En réalité, ilfait référence à cette performance artistique réalisée le 13 marsdernier, laquelle performance se trouvait être une forme renouvelée degungu, tradition populaire, à la fois politique et culturellecomorienne, assimilable au théâtre de rue. « On organise le gungutraditionnellement contre un acte mettant la communauté en péril. Nousavons revisité cette tradition sous forme de happening théâtral pourrappeler aux gens que le viol de l'intégrité territoriale des Comoresest un acte mettant à mal la communauté d'archipel. Mais que signifie legeste de Jérôme Gardon ? Que ceux qui ne sont pas d'accord avec laprésence française à Mayotte doivent se taire sous peine d'exclusion del'Alliance française de Moroni. Je peux comprendre sa décision. Mais delà à qualifier une performance durant laquelle personne n'a étéinquiétée de « manifestation violente », je pense qu'il déliretotalement, et j'essaie d'imaginer les personnes qui vont prendre cetteindication au pied de la lettre, en se demandant si je n'ai pas commisun acte terroriste. Quelle image veut-il donner de ma personne ? Ce quele directeur de l'Alliance française vient de faire est dangereux,diffamatoire, voire pervers » explique Soeuf Elbadawi.La nature des relations entre Soeuf Elbadawi et l'Alliance française deMoroni, institution au sein de la quelle il a beaucoup œuvré du milieudes années 80 au début des années 90, et avec laquelle il a continué àtravailler ces dix dernières années, a toujours été sans concessions, niambiguïtés. Soeuf Elbadawi n'a jamais omis de préciser ce qui fonde sontravail artistique aux Comores : « l'obsession de la citoyenneté ». Cequi n'a jamais dérangé la direction de l'Alliance par le passé. JérômeGardon s'était par ailleurs engagé depuis novembre 08 à prêter son lieuà la compagnie O Mcezo* pour trois étapes de travail, dont celle quivient d'être déprogrammé du 21 juin au 3 juillet 09, afin de créer Lafanfare des fous, un spectacle autour de la dépossession citoyenne.L'attitude de Jérôme Gardon, au-delà du fait qu'elle entérine une «relation tarifée » (le silence des artistes comoriens sur la réalitépolitique nationale contre le droit d'exister dans « son » lieu), obligeà réfléchir sur la qualification (« manifestation politique violente »)utilisée pour désigner l'expression citoyenne d'un artiste impliqué dansla réalité de son propre pays. Soeuf Elbadawi s'interroge : « Ce qui estterrible, c'est d'entendre le directeur de l'Alliance dire que lesComoriens membres de son comité d'administration m'interdisent l'accèsau plateau pour avoir dit que Mayotte est comorienne. Ceci revient àdire que Jérôme Gardon s'amuse à faire se dresser des Comoriens contred'autres Comoriens. Il serait intéressant de savoir ce qu'en pense leditcomité. Ce que je sais, c'est que Jérôme Gardon donne une image indignedes institutions culturelles françaises. Il engage son lieu contre unartiste pour délit d'expression. Ma performance parlait de dignité, derespect et de liberté. Ce qui explique la manière dont la population asalué l'événement en lui-même. Et que doit-on en conclure après cetteréaction du directeur de l'Alliance ? Que les chiens doivent se taire ?Peut-être qu'il faudrait lui expliquer à Jérôme Gardon que l'inimitié,on la fabrique dans une relation de tous les jours. Je ne voudrais pastomber dans la parano de ceux qui disent que la France coupe les ailes àtous les Comoriens venant lui rappeler qu'une autre relation auquotidien est possible. Mais lorsqu'on vire le plasticien Seda del'école française, et qu'on m'interdit de travailler sur le plateau del'Alliance, il y a de quoi s'interroger. Qu'est-ce que j'ai fait dedérangeant ? Dire mon attachement à mon pays ? Inscrire mon travailartistique dans une réalité complexe ? M'interroger sur une relationtronquée entre un pays plus fort et une entité insulaire plus faible ?Mais à quoi servirait un artiste dans cet archipel s'il ne faisait queparler du sel de la mer ? ».Suite à cette décision prise par la direction de l'Alliance française deMoroni, la compagnie O Mcezo* se retrouve sans lieu de répétitions poursa troisième étape de travail. Washko Ink., qui produit le travail de lacompagnie, regrette cette situation et s'apprête à en assumer lesconséquences. Les deux structures renouvèlent leur confiance à SoeufElbadawi, et l'encouragent à inscrire davantage son travail dansl'interrogation citoyenne. Washko ink. et la compagnie O Mcezo* sontpour l'implication des artistes, des auteurs et des intellectuels comoriens.ContactCie O Mcezo* || Washko Ink.B.P. 5357 Moroni - Union des Comores - Téléphone : 00 (269) 3203048E-mail : omcezo@yahoo.fr
Read more…

MRK Brazilian

Hi everyone,This website is just a fantastic idea, congratulation to Fabrice Jaumont.I hope to meet much more of the French community not only in NY but in the States and around the world.I also hope a lot of different people, from around the world, will come here and share their interest.All members of Electro Brazil are very impatient to share our music with all of you out there....A bientotbeijoMRK
Read more…
Until There: Laia Cabrera with For Feather and Isabelle DuvergerCatalan Video-Artist performs live with Brooklyn indie rock band For Feather and French Illustrator Isabelle Duverger“Until There” starts with images and movement as a visual storytelling, a sensual journey of the imaginary world of the filmmaker and visual artist, Laia Cabrera. Four screens with two video streams will surround you with a unique visual experience of timelessness and human landscape. She uses a variety of media: projected imagery merging cinematic arts, dance, photography, theater, visual arts, writing etc... As a part of the performance, Laia Cabrera will be working with visuals and drawing animation by Isabelle Duverger projected live in conjunction with indie pop/rock For Feather. The band has mastered the art of turning the mundane into the marvelous. Quirky melodies pull rather than push the listener, keeping things light with spacious harmonies evoking the early Beatles.Webpage of the event: http://www.monkeytownhq.com/6_8_09.htmlwww.laiacabrera.comwww.forfeather.comwww.isabelleduverger.com

Read more…

Ningueuses, ningueurs.

Ningueuses, ningueurs, c'est en ninguant, qu'on devient... plus connecté, plus informé, plus collectif donc plus efficace, capable d'avoir un impact plus important sur le monde qui nous entoure et plus à même de réaliser les initiatives qui nous tiennent à coeur. Ce Ning New York in French ouvrira ses portes officiellement le 1er juin. Il sera accessible sur internet par son adresse : nycfrench.ning.com Parlez-en
Read more…
If you've never read Amour, colère et folie in the original French, this is your summer. Time to read Marie Chauvet's classic before it comes out in August in first English language translation, Love, Anger, Madness (Random House, Modern Library; translation by Rose Réjouis & Val Vinokur). We hope to celebrate Chavet at the CUNY Graduate Center, this translation being an opportune time. Perhaps early October? Stay tuned. And for your French-challenged friends, this is a first opportunity, for late & great summer reading. Bonnes lectures!
Read more…

Je ningue, tu ningues, il ningue...

Qu'est-ce qu'un Ning ? Un Ning est une plateforme qui permet aux utilisateurs de créer leur propre réseau social. Ning est semblable à Facebook ou MySpace mais laisse à l'utilisateur l'entière liberté de concevoir, modifier, modérer, innover, rassembler autour d'un thème précis. Le mot ning veut dire "paix" en chinois mais la plateforme est américaine. Elle a été créée en Californie par Marc Andreessen and Gina Bianchini. Ning est la troisième compagnie de Andreessen qui a déjà lancé Netscape et Opsware. Ning n'est pas encore connu dans les pays francophones mais quelques exemples comme New York in French, créé par Fabrice Jaumont en mai 2009 permettent d'envisager les possibilités illimitées de ce type d'outils. Un Ning permettrait avant tout de rassembler la communauté francophone autour d'enjeux ou questions divers. Le Ning de New York in French est, quant à lui, centré sur l'éducation, l'apprentissage du français, la Francophonie à New York et aux alentours. New York in French permet de tchater, de bloguer, d'échanger collectivement, de créer des groupes de discussions, d'afficher des photos, des vidéos, des fichiers sons, des documents, etc. Le verbe ninguer (prononcer comme swinguer) n'existe pas encore dans le dictionnaire. Je me permet de le proposer à tous. Ninguons ensemble mes frères et mes soeurs. Fabrice Jaumont
Read more…
============================================================================= - October 20 - 5pm to 8pm - Reception for Shimon Waronker (former Principal at CIS22 - Bronx), Giselle Gault (Principal at PS58 - Brooklyn), Robin Sundick (Principal at PS84 - Upper West Side) and Jean Mirville (Principal at PS73 - Bronx) - Location: Mars 2112 (1633 Broadway & 51st street. 800 school principals invited. Invitation only. If you are a parent seeking to open a French-English program in your school, this could be your chance. Send me an email asap to receive an invitation. ============================================================================== - October 24th - New York French American Charter School is pleased to invite you and your family to join us on Saturday, October 24 to celebrate the birth of NYFACS in Harlem, the First Public French-American School to open in September 2010 115 West 128th street (between 2-6pm) Further details on http://www.nyfacschool.org ========================================================================== Background ========================================================================== With globalization a fact, and cultural diversity an ever-increasing reality, New York’s public schools have opened themselves up to the learning of foreign languages but also to the teaching of traditional core content areas in a language other than English. According to the New York Department of Education, students who will speak a second language will be better prepared to succeed in a multicultural world and will be able to preserve their cultural heritage. Since 2005, new programs in the French language have emerged en force in the public schools. The impetus that created the rapid success of these programs is a result of the synergy between multiple partners—French, Francophone, and Francophile. These actors have offered an alternative to parents who seek not only to offer an economically feasible solution for a dual English-French education, but also a more diverse choice in their children’s education. The French Government, through its Embassy, American foundations such as FACE (French-American Cultural Exchange) and the Alfred & Jane Ross Foundation, Grand Marnier Foundation, as well as the parent association Education Française à New York (EFNY) and the Friends of New York French-American Bilingual and Multicultural Education are amongst those institutions that have grasped the importance of dual language education and have consolidated their efforts to work with the city’s public schools. The Cultural Services provides the text books and offers trainings and workshops for the professors; additionally, the Cultural Services contributes logistical and financial aid to the schools. The parent association EFNY serves as both the go-between between the schools, the parents and the Cultural Services and the spokesperson for the Francophone families in New York. EFNY’s numerous initiatives facilitated the relationship between the Department of Education and the Francophone families. The Alfred & Jane Ross Foundation has brought its financial support and expertise in the development of innovative programming and pedagogy. New partners are also joining us in this initiative: the Québec Government Office, the Association catholique des Sénégalais d’Amérique (ASA) and multiple active members of the Haitian community. Almost 700 students are enrolled in one of these programs in New York. Over 1,000 students are expected for the 2009-2010 school year. The curriculum and pedagogy of each program varies from school to school: dual-language classes, after-school classes, heritage classes and preparations for the GED exam. A – Twenty dual-language classes – The students are between 5 and 10 years old. In September 2009, six New York public schools opened their doors to bilingual classes (French- English). The schools are PS125 (Harlem), PS58 (Caroll Gardens - Brooklyn), PS73 (Bronx), CIS22 (Bronx), PS84 (Upper West Side)., and PS151 in Woodside (Queens). In the Fall of 2009, these schools opened a total of 20 classes, serving more than 500 students. In just two year’s time the programs increased enrolment nine- fold! These immersion classes in French and English are geared toward Francophones, Anglophones and bilingual students, as well as students who speak little or no English. Each individual school assures its own individual enrolment. These classes join more than 70 other dual language programs (Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Haitian Creole and Korean) financed by the city of New York. A new public school will offer a French program in September 2010: PS84 in Williamsburg (Brooklyn). For information and donations, visit http://www.newyorkinfrench.net/page/french-goes-public or join the Create a French Program group B – Eight after-school French programs – The students are between 5 and 13 years old. The parents of the students of EFNY (Education Française à New York) propose after-school and extra-curricular French programs in multiple public schools. Following the initiative of a small group of Francophone and Francophile parents dedicated to the French language and Francophone cultures, the EFNY became an official entity in 2005. EFNY’s goal is to share the French language with their children and to offer financially feasible options of educating their children in French. The after-school classes take place in the public schools under the supervision of volunteers taking part in the FLAM committee. These programs benefit from funding from the French government (FLAM, Français Langue Maternelle), which the EFNY obtained of its own accord. The public schools contribute the classroom spaces to EFNY. These factors (the organization of EFNY parents and volunteers, free classroom space, FLAM funds) allow the after-school program to keep their operational costs relatively low. There exist seven locations for the after-school programs: PS234 (Tribeca), PS41 (Greenwich Village), PS363 (East Village), PS58 (Carroll Gardens), PS10 (Park Slope), PS59 (Midtown East), PS 84 (Upper West Side) and PS 183 (Upper East Side). This program serves about 200 students, who are for the most part French. For information and donations, visit http:www.efny.net or join their group on this website. C - Six French Heritage Language Programs– The students are between 5 and 18 years old. The French Heritage Language Program (FHLP) is piloted by the French Embassy in partnership with the Alfred & Jane Ross Foundation. The generous support of several other foundations as well as individuals throughout New York also enables the FHLP to offer French classes to children of Francophone families, who are recently immigrated to the United States. FHLP was created to promote and enrich heritage language learning of French and to encourage the learning of French and Francophone cultures by students of Francophone origin in the New York public schools. The primary objective is to promote bilingualism by helping students maintain and develop solid competency in French in order to perpetuate the connections with their countries of origin, while improving their chances of success and integration into American culture and society. The goal is to develop and affirm the linguistic, professional and personal development of each student so as to affirm the student’s identity and encourage the confidence of the immigrant students as they transition into their new environment. In New York, 110 students currently participate in this program in six locations: Brooklyn International HS, Bronx International HS, International HS at Prospect Heights (Brooklyn), International HS at Lafayette (Brooklyn), International Community HS (Bronx) and PS125 (Harlem). An intensive summer camp, offered in July, is also associated with the program. Fun pedagogical activities enable the students to improve their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Field trips to art museums, Francophone institutions, guest speakers, films, dance and theater workshops, as well as a one-week trip to Québec, almost fully financed by philanthropists, also renders this program exceptional. The French Heritage Language Program also has as its objective to create pedagogical materials specially adapted to the teaching of French as a heritage language, implemented in the New York classrooms, and also available online for programs throughout the country to adapt to their own needs. For information and donations, visit http://facecouncil.org/fhlp D – A new charter school will open in September 2010: The New York French-American Charter School - NYFACS Open to everyone, Free, Charter School, Open to the world, Bilingual / biliterate, Teaching from multiple points of view, Focused on the individual, Small classes, Flexible learning environment, Designed for excellence, High academic standards. The Best of Two Educational Systems: NYFACS incorporates both the American and French approaches toward learning by taking the best from each and creating an educational system that is better than its parts. From the French system we take: Rigor, Structure, Inductive reasoning approach to teaching, A deeper approach to topics studied, In-depth study of grammar and analysis of language, Emphasis on method, organization, and neatness. From the American system we take: Flexibility, Constructivist approach to student-oriented learning, Broader approach to topics studied, Emphasis on individual thought and creativity, Attention to individual learning styles as well as learning disabilities, Large opportunity for participation in student affairs and activities. Teachers teach in their native language and thus teach their culture. History class becomes a true vehicle in teaching a world view. Students study the history of their countries with a native viewpoint, thus not only reinforcing their own identity but also inviting all students to analyze and compare points of view. NYFACS is not only a combination of these two systems, it is a living, breathing, multicultural environment in which students grow up free from the prejudices that often bind people who have been raised in an insular environment with only one world view and approach to education. Our students become well-educated, true citizens of the world. For information and donations, visit http://www.nyfacschool.org or join their group on this website. E - Two GED programs in French – The students are between 17 and 21 years old. The GED (General Educational Development) is an exam enabling students who do not have a high school diploma or a French Baccalauréat to validate their studies so as to earn an equivalency of these degrees. The preparation for this exam may be prepared at two centers: the Linden Learning Center in Brooklyn and the Jamaica Learning Center in Queens. Almost 250 students enroll in the GED French language preparation courses each year. E – An increased need for teachers of French. The need for French teachers has already increased and will continue to do so as new programs open up. In the case of Francophone teachers wanting to teach in these programs, the New York certification and a B.A. diploma of at least four years is often required. For teachers certified outside of the state of New York, it is possible to obtain an equivalency through a strict evaluation administered on a case by case basis by the Department of Education. For more information,visit the Certification group on this website and join the For Teachers group. F – French Goes Public, a Franco-American fundraising campaign to support these programs. Since 2007, at the initiative of Kareen Rispal, Cultural Counselor of the French Embassy in New York, the campaign to raise funds for French Goes Public was launched to support the various French language teaching programs in New York. In France, the Senate, the Ministère de l’Education nationale and the Ministère des Affaires étrangères et européennes quickly contributed their support. The donations of foundations and individual are allowing us to match the contributions coming from France. The website Network for Good enables individuals to safely and efficiently make their donation online. These donations, contributed to the non-profit FACE, are tax-deductible. These donations are used to purchase textbooks and to fund teacher training and workshops. Book banks such as Adiflor and Biblionef, and Canadian book companies and libraries, as well as book donations from Francophile New York friends also assure that the classrooms meet their needs. Donate here Fabrice Jaumont Note sur les ecoles publiques de New York.pdf Notes sur les ecoles privees de New York.pdf
Read more…
New York in French par Fabrice Jaumont Depuis 2005, de nouveaux programmes en langue française se sont consolidés dans les écoles publiques sous l’impulsion de plusieurs partenaires français, francophones et francophiles, offrant aux familles francophones une alternative économe et un plus grand choix pour scolariser leurs enfants. Le gouvernement français, par le biais du Service culturel de l’Ambassade de France, les fondations américaines comme le French-American Cultural Exchange Council (FACE) et la Alfred & Jane Ross Foundation, ainsi que l’association de parents francophones Education Française à New York (EFNY) ont particulièrement compris ces enjeux et ciblé leurs actions sur les écoles publiques de la ville. Le Service culturel, notamment, fournit des livres scolaires et propose des formations aux professeurs, tout en offrant de l'assistance logistique et financière aux écoles. L’association de parents EFNY assure un rôle de ralliement et de porte parole pour les familles francophones. Ses nombreuses activités ont permis d’ouvrir des brèches importantes dans un système public parfois peu sensible aux besoins des familles francophones. La fondation Alfred & Jane Ross apporte son soutien financier et son expertise dans le développement de programmes innovants (comme le programme French Heritage). De nouveaux partenaires se joignent peu à peu à cette initiative : la Délégation générale du Québec, l’Association des Sénégalais d’Amérique (ASA) et plusieurs membres actifs de la communauté haïtienne. La langue française est une langue d’immersion privilégiée car elle a été choisie comme la langue cible du programme d'immersion de 38 comtés ou districts scolaires aux États-Unis. C’est près d’une centaine d’écoles publiques, 12 000 élèves, 600 enseignants et assistants qui sont ainsi concernés. Les programmes d’immersion en français forment les futurs effectifs des lycées français, des départements d’études françaises, des Alliances françaises, des Chambres de Commerce franco-américaines, etc. Le développement de ces programmes ne peut qu’être bénéfique à la présence du français dans ce pays. Le français est aussi langue d'enseignement dans près d'une quarantaine d'établissements privés, homologués par le Ministère français de l'éducation nationale. A l'échelle locale, on se rend compte de la formation de villages francophones autour de ces écoles. C'est saisissant. A Brooklyn, le quartier de Carroll Gardens connaît même une hausse des coûts de l'immobilier alors que nous sommes en pleine crise économique. Pour certaines écoles, surtout les plus défavorisées, l'objectif est de diversifier la population de l'école en attirant des familles francophones ou francophiles. On se rend compte aussi que des familles de classe moyenne reviennent vers les écoles publiques qui proposent un programme bilingue français-anglais après avoir boudé le système public pendant des années. C'est ce que j'appelle une révolution silencieuse. Les parents sont le moteur de cette révolution silencieuse, sous leur pression les directeurs d''école acceptent d'ouvrir des programmes. On les retrouve derrière l'ouverture de classes bilingues ou d'autres formes de programmes. Un comité de travail composé de parents et de spécialistes travaille activement à la création d’une école à charte (New York French American Charter School) dans laquelle un élève pourrait suivre toute sa scolarité en français. Des programmes extrascolaires, par exemple, sont proposés par des parents d’élèves de l’association EFNY (Education Française à New York) dans plusieurs écoles publiques. L’association a été officiellement constituée en 2005 à l'initiative d'un petit groupe de parents français attachés à la culture et à la langue françaises et désireux de partager cette langue avec leurs enfants et de leur offrir des options éducatives pratiques et abordables (face aux coûts exorbitants des lycées français privés). Sous la forme de cours du soir ou après l’école (after school), ces classes payantes prennent place dans des écoles publiques de la ville et sont entièrement gérés par des parents bénévoles sous la direction du comité FLAM. Ces programmes bénéficient d’une subvention du gouvernement français (FLAM, Français Langue Maternelle) obtenue par EFNY. Les écoles publiques mettent les classes à la disposition d’EFNY gracieusement. Ces facteurs (coordination bénévole par EFNY, gestion par parents bénévoles, locaux gratuits, subvention FLAM) permettent de garder les coûts au plus bas. Il y a aujourd’hui neuf sites : PS234 (Tribeca), PS70 (Astoria - Queens), PS41 (Greenwich Village), PS363 (East Village), PS58 (Carroll Gardens), PS10 (Park Slope), PS59 (Midtown East), PS 84 (Upper West Side) et PS183 (Upper East Side). Ce programme sert approximativement 150 élèves. Au niveau des gouvernements, la mise sur pied d'une stratégie de subventions à grande échelle en faveur des programmes d'immersion ou bilingue, du même type que celle établie pour certains départements de français dans les universités américaines, répondrait aux attentes de cette nouvelle catégorie de francophiles que sont les élèves des classes bilingues qui vouent un amour profond pour la langue française qu'ils maîtrisent depuis leur plus tendre enfance. L'impact de tels fonds, qu'ils ciblent la consolidation de programmes existants ou la création de nouveaux programmes peut faire pencher les décisions en faveur du français, surtout celles d'administrateurs locaux. Un tel effort pourrait renverser la tendance et avoir un effet catalyseur sur la propagation de la langue française dans les programmes d'immersion et au-delà. Ils répondraient aux attentes de très nombreux parents et professeurs de français. Aujourd'hui, je pense que nous devrions investir massivement dans ce secteur avec des incitations financières pour l'ouverture de programme français-anglais dans les écoles primaires. Bien plus que ce que les gouvernements francophones ou américain ont investi jusqu'à présent. C'est par là que, à mes yeux, le français gagnera du terrain aux Etats-Unis. C'est par là aussi que les Etats-Unis se doteront d'une vraie politique linguistique ouvrant un plus grand nombre de citoyens sur le monde. Dans la presse.doc
Read more…

Visit our bookstore

Visit our store

Learn French