Columbia Maison Francaise's Events (217)

February 27, 2017
Monday
  • Music performance by Irène Jacob and Francis Jacob

  • Feb 27, 2017 from 2:00pm to 3:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    The award-winning French actress Irène Jacob and her brother Francis Jacob offer an intimate musical performance at the Maison Française of songs from their new album, En Bas de Chez Moi, with Irene on vocals and Francis on guitar, and song lyrics composed by the duo. Irene’s full bio is provided above. 

    Irène Jacob is an internationally acclaimed French actress. Her first film role was in Louis Malle’s Au Revoir les Enfants, and she gained acclaim through her work with Polish film director  Krzysztof Kieslowski, winning the 1991 Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actress for The Double Life of Véronique.  Her other film appearances include Kieslowski’s Three Colors: Red (1994),  The Secret Garden (1993), Beyond the Clouds (1995), U.S. Marshals (1998), and Eternity (2016).  She has joined the cast of The Affair this season as a seductive French professor. Annette Insdorf is a professor of film studies in Columbia’s School of the Arts and her books include Dou

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February 20, 2017
Monday
  • Journal d'un écrivain en pyjama

  • Feb 20, 2017 from 1:00pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    *Distinguished Eugene J. Sheffer Lecture by Dany Laferrière Lecture in French

    Dany Laferrière’s Journal d'un écrivain en pyjama started off as a how-to book about writing, but quickly evolved into a 320-page exploration of writing that includes “notes, reflections, meditations and digressions,” and advice to aspiring authors in the form of stories. According to the author, “I thought that a how-to book might be a bit dreary. It would only be of interest to those who write. So instead of focusing on the writer who writes, I broadened my scope to all aspiring writers: the writer in pyjamas. To me, the writer in pyjamas has every right to write even if he doesn’t get published.”

    Dany Laferrière is a Haitian-Canadian novelist and journalist who writes in French. He was elected to the Académie française in 2013 and inducted in May 2015, becoming the first Haitian, the first Canadian and the first Quebecois to receive that honor.  He is the author of twenty books, be

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February 16, 2017
Thursday
  • La Double Vie de Véronique

  • Feb 16, 2017 from 1:30pm to 4:00pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    Film Screening followed by Q&A with starring actress Irène Jacob, in conversation with Annette Insdorf

    Veronique (Irène Jacob) is a beautiful young French woman who aspires to be a renowned singer; Weronika (also Jacob) lives in Poland, has a similar career goal and looks identical to Veronique, though the two are not related. The film follows both women as they contend with the ups and downs of their individual lives, with Veronique embarking on an unusual romance with a Alexandre Fabbri (Philippe Volter), a puppeteer who may be able to help her with her existential issues. Roger Ebert: “The movie has a hypnotic effect. We are drawn into the character, not kept at arm's length with a plot… This is one of the most beautiful films I've seen.”

    Irène Jacob is an internationally acclaimed French actress. Her first film role was in Louis Malle’s Au Revoir les Enfants, and she gained acclaim through her work with Polish film director  Krzysztof Kieslowski, winning th

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February 15, 2017
Wednesday
  • French Slam Poetry Jam: Résidents de la République

  • Feb 15, 2017 from 1:00pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    *Performance by Capitaine Alexandre in French

    Marc Alexandre Oho Bambe is a French slammer poet, performer, author, and winner of the Prix Paul Verlaine de poésie de l’Académie Française.

    He will perform readings and slam poetry, drawing on his newly published book, Résidents de la République, written “in a state of emergency”  that presents writings and reflections “in favor of finding ways of living together, against the defeat of ideals, desperation, and fatalism.”

    This event is featured as part of “le Français dans tous ses états”, a series of events supported by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S.

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February 10, 2017
Friday
  • The EU at 60: Europe since the Treaty of Rome

  • Feb 10, 2017 from 6:00am to 10:30am
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, this event will offer an opportunity of dialogue among scholars and practitioners of the European Union, who will reflect upon the Treaty of Rome in a historical perspective and discuss the future of the EU.

    Speakers include:  Victoria De Grazia (Professor of History and Acting Director of the European Institute), Rui Tavares (Visiting Scholar at NYU Remarque Institute, former Member of the European Parliament), Adam Tooze (Professor of History), Nadia Urbinati (Professor of Political Theory and Hellenic Studies), Joao Vale de Almeida (Ambassador, Head of the EU Delegation to the United Nations), Pierre Vimont (Visiting Professor at the European Institute, former Executive Secretary General of the European External Action Service). 

    Event co-sponsored by the European Institute, the Maison Française, and the Italian Cultural Institute. This event is made possible thanks to the support of the "Getting to Know Europe" program of

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February 8, 2017
Wednesday
  • The Ink of the Scholars: Reflections on Philosophy in Africa

  • Feb 8, 2017 from 1:15pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University, Heyman Center, Common Room (on Columbia's East Campus)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    Souleymane Bachir Diagne talks about his book, The Ink of the Scholars: Reflections on Philosophy in Africa, recently translated into English, in a panel discussion with Gary Wilder and Mamadou Diouf. 

    Souleymane Bachir Diagne is a Professor of Philosophy and French and the Chair of the Department of French at Columbia University.  His areas of expertise include history of logic, history of philosophy, Islamic philosophy, and African philosophy and literature.  Mamadou Diouf is a Professor of History and African Studies at Columbia.  Gary Wilder is Associate Professor of Anthropology at CUNY.

    This event is co-sponsored by the Heyman Center for the Humanities as part of their series on New Books in the Arts & Sciences and the Maison Française.

     

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February 1, 2017
Wednesday
  • Memoirs with Serge and Beate Klarsfeld

  • Feb 1, 2017 from 1:00pm to 3:00pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    Serge and Beate Klarsfeld met as young students at Sciences Po – she the daughter of a German Wehrmacht soldier, and he the son of a Romanian Jew who died in Auschwitz. They have devoted their lives to hunting down Nazis and bringing them to justice, and to restoring and maintaining the memory of victims of the Shoah. As private citizens, they wield neither political nor police power, depending instead on dramatic acts of moral symbolism to get results. The first and purest example was Beate's public slapping of West German Chancellor Kurt Georg Kiesinger in 1968. That slap was a reproach to the presumption that a man who had been an ambitious Nazi propagandist should lead a new, democratic Germany. Kiesinger lost the 1969 general election to Willy Brandt, who had been an opponent of and a refugee from Nazism.  In their autobiography, they reflect on their shared lives and on 45 years of activism on behalf of victims of the Holocaust. Their Memoirs will be pu

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January 30, 2017
Monday
  • The Politics of the Psyche - A lecture by Camille Robcis

  • Jan 30, 2017 from 1:00pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française (East Gallery in Buell Hall)
  • Description:

    To RSVP, please click here.

    This talk maps the intersections of politics, psychoanalysis, and psychiatry in France in the aftermath of May ’68.  For many thinkers during these years, Marxism could offer a theory of alienation to explain why the protesters had taken to the streets, but it was unable to account for why the revolution was systematically aborted.  Why were libidinal politics consistently repressed by the “fascism in our heads,” “the fascism that causes us to love power, to desire the thing that dominates and exploits us,” to quote Michel Foucault?  In this context, several of these thinkers – including Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari – turned to psychiatry in the hope of finding a new theory of the subject that could embrace and reclaim these libidinal politics.  This talk revisits this history and explores the possibilities behind a politics of the psyche.

    Camille Robcis is an Associate Professor of History at Cornell University and the author of The Law of Kinship: Anthr

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January 28, 2017
Saturday
January 25, 2017
Wednesday
  • Night And Fog with Sylvie Lindeperg

  • Jan 25, 2017 from 1:00pm to 3:00pm
  • Location: Columbia University Maison Française
  • Description:

    *To RSVP, please click here.

    Screening and analysis by film historian Sylvie Lindeperg, moderated by Jane Gaines

    Following a screening of this 32-minute classic 1955 documentary by Alain Resnais about the Nazi death camps, Sylvie Lindeperg will present her research and analysis of the film, the subject of her book-length study, Nuit et Brouillard. Un film dans l’histoire (2007).

    Sylvie Lindeperg is a historian, a member of the Institut Universitaire de France, and a professor at the Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Her research focuses on history, memory and cinema, with a particular focus on the Second World War. Lindeperg has written and edited one dozen books including Les Écrans de l’ombre (1997 and 2014), Clio de 5 à 7 (2000), Univers concentrationnaire et génocide. Voir, savoir, comprendre, in collaboration with Annette Wieviorka (2008), and La Voie des images (2013).

    This event is funded by the Knapp Family Foundation. This event is co-sponsored by the Columbia Maison Franca

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December 2, 2016
Friday
  • Digital Carribbean III

  • Dec 2, 2016 from 4:00am to 2:00pm
  • Location: Columbia Maison Française
  • Description:
    Following on conversations that animated Caribbean Digital events in 2014 and 2015, this third
    public forum will engage critically with the digital both as practice and as a historicized societal
    phenomenon, reflecting on the challenges and opportunities presented by the media technologies
    that are reconfiguring the social and geographic contours of the Caribbean. Conference
    organized by Kaiama Glover and Alex Gil. For full agenda and list of participants please visit
    Conference Agenda
    9:00-9:30 a.m.
    Welcome and Opening Remarks
    9:30-11:00 a.m.
    Panel 1: Digital Diasporic Religion
    11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
    Panel 2: Mapping Caribbean Concepts
    12:30-1:30 p.m.
    Lunch Break
    1:45-3:00 p.m.
    Panel 3: Tales from the Archive
    3:15-4:30 p.m.
    Panel 4: Multimedia Melting Pots
    4:45-6:00 p.m.
    Panel 5: Caribbean Praxis
    6:00-7:00 p.m.
    Closing Panel: Framing Digital Art
    Conference co-sponsored by French Department, Program in Comparative Literature, and
    Africana Studies Department at Barnard College, and by th
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November 17, 2016
Thursday
  • France, Story of a Childhood

  • Nov 17, 2016 from 1:00pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Columbia Maison Française
  • Description:
    France, Story of a Childhood
    Zahia Rahmani, in conversation with Madeleine Dobie
    This moving tale of imprisonment and escape, persecution and loss, is narrated by the daughter of an alleged Harki, an Algerian soldier who fought for the French during the Algerian War for Independence. It was the fate of such men to be twice exiled, first in their homeland after the war, and later in France, where fleeing Harki families sought refuge but instead
    faced contempt, discrimination, and exclusion. Zahia Rahmani blends reality and imagination, offering a fictionalized version of her own family’s struggle. While she delves deeply into the past, she also indicts present-day France and Algeria. From the unique perspective of the daughter of an accused Harki, she examines France’s complex history with its former
    colony. She makes a stirring plea for understanding between generations and cultures, and especially for an end to the destructive practice of condemning children for their fathers’ actions and
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November 14, 2016
Monday
  • Beyond the Secular State: Secularism, Empire, Hegemony

  • Nov 14, 2016 from 1:15pm to 3:15pm
  • Location: Columbia Law School
  • Description:
    Beyond the Secular State: Secularism, Empire, Hegemony
    A roundtable conversation with Talal Asad, Etienne Balibar, and Mohamed Amer-Meziane
    According to critiques, secularism is more exclusionary than emancipative. French secularism
    (laïcité) and its current relation to Muslims is widely considered as the paradigmatic example.
    But secularists often claim that such exclusions are not "really secular" and distort the truth of
    secularism. Their claim is given credit by the attacks against the idea of secularization emanating
    from “fundamentalist” religious discourses, some of which are violent indeed. However, seen
    from outside the Eurocentric West, this defense of secularism would be more convincing if
    secularists displayed a greater capacity to criticize their own tradition. This roundtable discussion will examine these questions from a genealogical, philosophical, and political
    perspective.
    Talal Asad is a Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at CUNY; Etienne Balibar is currently a Visiting P
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November 9, 2016
Wednesday
  • Can Historical Memory Prevent Against a Return to Mass Violence?

  • Nov 9, 2016 from 1:00pm to 2:30pm
  • Location: Maison Française
  • Description:
    In his newest book, Henry Rousso, one of the first historians to
    have worked on the memory of collective historical traumas,
    examines recent developments in the uses and politics of memory
    in France, and shows how these phenomena must also be
    considered within a broader European and global context. The
    stakes are high: the considerable efforts made by modern societies to preserve the memory of historical traumas has not inoculated them against a tragic return to mass violence.
    Henry Rousso is Director of Research at the CNRS (Institut d'histoire du temps présent) and teaches in France and the United States. His books include The Vichy Syndrome; The Haunting  Past: History, Memory, and Justice in Contemporary France; and The Latest Catastrophe: History, the Present, the Contemporary.
    Event co-sponsored by the Alliance Program and the Department of History and the University
    Seminar on Cultural Memory
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November 2, 2016
Wednesday
  • Translating Souffles-Anfas: A Conversation with Readings

  • Nov 2, 2016 from 2:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Location: Columbia Maison Française
  • Description:
    Founded in 1966 by avant-garde Moroccan poets and artists and banned in 1972, Souffles-Anfas was one of the most influential literary, cultural, and political reviews to emerge in postcolonial North Africa. This conversation and selected readings with the editors and translators of Souffles-Anfas: A
    Critical Anthology from the Moroccan Journal of Culture and Politics marks the fiftieth anniversary of this incendiary Third Worldist review.
    Participants:
    •Teresa Villa-Ignacio, Postdoctoral Fellow, Tulane University, co-editor of Souffles-Anfas: A Critical Anthology
    •Olivia C. Harrison, Assistant Professor, University of Southern
    California, co-editor of Souffles-Anfas: A Critical Anthology
    •Thomas Speare, Professor of French, CUNY Graduate Center
    •Omar Berrada, Director of Dar Al-Ma’mûn
    Event co-sponsored by the Institute of African Studies and MESAAS. This event is featured as part of “le Français dans tous ses états”, a series of events supported by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy
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September 16, 2015
Wednesday
  • 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21): What to expect and what should follow?

  • Sep 16, 2015 from 2:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Location: Columbia University - Maison Francaise in Buell Hall
  • Description:

    A conversation with Laurence Tubiana and Scott Barrett moderated by Gavin Schmidt

    Part of a series of events in anticipation of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference

    RSVP required HERE

    The United Nations Climate Change Conference, or COP21, will take place in Paris in December 2015.  Laurence Tubiana and Scott Barrett discuss the expectations, hopes, and likely outcomes of the upcoming climate negotiations and consider what the next steps should be to maintain any chance of mitigating the disastrous global climate changes experts are expecting in the coming decades.

    Laurence Tubiana is founder and director of the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations IDDRI at Sciences Po in Paris and Professor of International Affairs at Columbia s SIPA.  Laurence Tubiana was appointed Special Representative of the French Minister of Foreign Affairs, Laurent Fabius, for the 2015 Paris Climate Conference. Scott Barrett is the Lenfest Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Econ

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September 10, 2015
Thursday
  • THE RABBI’S CAT (Le Chat du Rabbin)

  • Sep 10, 2015 from 3:30pm to 5:30pm
  • Location: Columbia University Low Library Steps
  • Description:

    THE RABBI’S CAT (Le Chat du Rabbin)

    Joann Sfar and Antoine Delesvaux,  2011, 90 min.

    Event Location: Low Plaza Steps

    This animated film is set in Algiers in the 1920s. Rabbi Sfar has more than one problem. His beautiful daughter Zlabya is transforming into a teenager, and even worse, his parrot-killing cat has just started talking. The Rabbi’s life grows all the more complicated when a box arrives from Russia with a painter inside. Ultimately Rabbi Sfar ends up on a quest for a hidden tribe and its mythical city of origin in Africa.

    This screening is featured as part of the Films on the Green Festival organized by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, FACE and the City of New York Parks & Recreation. Sponsorship is provided by Air France, BNP Paribas, and TV5 Monde.

     

    *Please note that in case of rain, the screening will be held in the East Gallery in Buell Hall—seating is limited. No alcohol is permitted at this event.

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May 6, 2015
Wednesday
  • Film: Adieu Berthe, ou L'Enterrement de Mémé (Granny’s Funeral)

  • May 6, 2015 from 2:30pm to 5:00pm
  • Location: East Gallery, Buell Hall, Columbia University
  • Description:

    Movies are screened in the East Gallery followed by a moderated discussion in French. Attendance is free. Unless indicated otherwise, films are in French with English subtitles. Please note the new, earlier start time.

    Bruno Podalydès, 2012, 100 min.

    Granny is dead. Berthe is no more. Armand's grandmother had sort of slipped his mind... Armand runs a pharmacy in the Paris suburbs with his wife, Helene. In a medicine cabinet he hides his magical equipment -he's secretly preparing a show for the daughter... of his lover, Alix. And Granny? Should she be buried or cremated? Who was Berthe?

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May 5, 2015
Tuesday
  • Digits & Treasuries: How to Address the Fiscal Challenges of the Digital Economy?

  • May 5, 2015 from 2:00pm to 3:30pm
  • Location: East Gallery, Buell Hall, Columbia University
  • Description:

    A panel discussion with Pierre Collin and Martin Collet, moderated by Bernard Harcourt

    The digital revolution has given rise to a digital economy that challenges our concept of value creation. Increasingly, start-ups and global companies serving millions of users are changing the rules and bringing radical transformation to all sectors of the economy, but the value added is slipping through our grasp. The productivity gains achieved through the digital economy have not led to increased tax revenues for large countries and global digital economy companies pay a low level of tax on their profits. A fiscal response is urgently needed. This discussion will explore what this fiscal response could look like and how countries might regain the power to tax profits earned by digital economy companies.

    Pierre Collin is a member of the Conseil d’Etat and teaches at the Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris II). He is the former Chief Adviser of the French Minister for Economy and Finance and co-author o

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April 30, 2015
Thursday
  • Nostalgia

  • Apr 30, 2015 from 2:00pm to 3:30pm
  • Location: East Gallery, Buell Hall, Columbia University
  • Description:

    Barbara Cassin

    Why do we sometimes feel like strangers even when we are at home? Why do we sometimes feel at home in places where we have no roots? Why do we like to return there and why do we feel nostalgic when we are away? What does it mean to be at home? Can we ever really be at home? These are just some of the questions treated by philosopher and philologist Barbara Cassin in her new work Nostalgia: When Are We Ever at Home?  (La Nostalgie, Quand donc est-on chez soi ? Ulysse, Enée, Arendt, Autrement, 2013.) Through a subtle re-reading of the writings of Homer, Virgil, and Hannah Arendt, Cassin produces an in-depth analysis, at once scholarly and personal, of nostalgia and its relationship to language.

    Barbara Cassin is a French philologist and philosopher.  She is Emeritus Research Director at the CNRS in Paris. Cassin is the author or editor of more than 20 works of philosophy, including the  Dictionary of Untranslatables (2004 / English translation 2014), a philosophical lexicon

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